Lauren Fox 


Hi, I’m Lauren and I’m a multidisciplinary designer and art director based in New York City. Currently, I’m working on all things editorial design and art direction at The New York Times Magazine. Previously, I’ve worked at Pentagram, Google, Instrument, and Other Means collaborating on projects across branding, web design, editorial design, and more.


Layout and art direction for the second issue of Google Design Magazine. Completed in collaboration with Pat Iadanza, Chloe Scheffe, and Natalie Shields.


Generating patterns via a user interface created using Python in Drawbot. The pattern can be customized according to a variety of parameters including stroke weight, color, padding and more. Completed under the guidance of Ben Kiel at Washington University in St. Louis.


A revival typeface based on Scotch Roman letterforms found in a 1919 print of the Italian novel, Contro Une e Contro Tutti. Completed in Spring 2019 under the guidance of Alessio D’Ellena at the Santa Reparata International School of Art in Florence, Italy. Further documentation coming soon. View specimen (→)


How can you represent a physical space in a book? This printed collection of herbarium vouchers from The Missouri Botanical Garden displays the garden’s long history of restoration efforts and highlights the wide variety of herbaria on display at the gardens. Completed under the guidance of Chrissi Cowhey at Washington University in St. Louis. 


Brand identity and poster design for Google’s collaboration with San Francisco Design Week whose 2022 theme was Edge Effect. Completed in collaboration with Megan Lynch, Amber Pietrzyk, and Kate Cullinane.


Art direction guidance and web design for Figma’s new blog, Shortcut. Completed in collaboration with Arietta Tetreault, Patsy Shin, James Casey, Flora Kim, and many others at Instrument.


Using shapes derived from existing typography, such as serifs, terminals, bowls, I challenged both myself and my peers to create letterforms from a curated collection of shapes. Completed under the guidance of Alessio D’Ellena at the Santa Reparata International School of Art in Florence, Italy.


Various art direction work for Google Design to be used both online and in print. Featured illustrators: Jatinder Singh Durhailay, Anna Mills, Hannah Buckman, and Max Guther. Completed with the help of Anyways Creative.


Creating vector duotones using Python and Drawbot. The code translates the image pixels into flat geometric shapes and the parameters of the function can be varied to customize the duotone effect, such as the size of the pixels, the density of the pixels and more. View the code here and feel free to try it out yourself. Created with the help of Ben Kiel at Washington University in St. Louis.


An interactive guide to the Abstract Expressionist art movement of the 1950s in New York City that rocked the international art scene. Completed under the guidance of Jonathan Hanahan in Spring 2020 at Washington University in St. Louis. Visit the live site (→)


Fictional posters for events and exhibitions at the Museo del Novecento in Florence, Italy. Museo del Novecento is Florence’s only contemporary art museum. Completed under the guidance of Silvia Aggozzino at the Santa Reparata International School of Art in Florence, Italy in Spring 2019.


laurenalanafox@gmail.com


Last updated:
09/12/23, 10:39 PM


Lauren Fox
Design & Art Direction
Last update:
08/30/23, 4:45pm

Hi, I’m Lauren and I’m a multidisciplinary designer and art director based in New York City. Currently, I’m working on all things editorial design and art direction at The New York Times Magazine. Previously, I’ve worked at Pentagram, Google, Instrument, and Other Means collaborating on projects across branding, web design, editorial design, and more. Resume available upon request.


Selected Clients:

Apple
The Architectural League
of New York

Central Park Conservatory
Figma
Google
Harper Collins
Harvard Graduate School of Design

Tacombi
Thames & Hudson
The New York Times

Verizon
Yale School of Art


Contact:

laurenalanafox@gmail.com
Instagram
Are.na

Layout and art direction for the second issue of Google Design Magazine. Completed in collaboration with Pat Iadanza, Chloe Scheffe, and Natalie Shields.

Generating patterns via a user interface created using Python in Drawbot. The pattern can be customized according to a variety of parameters including stroke weight, color, padding and more. Completed under the guidance of Ben Kiel at Washington University in St. Louis.

A revival typeface based on Scotch Roman letterforms found in a 1919 print of the Italian novel, Contro Une e Contro Tutti. Completed in Spring 2019 under the guidance of Alessio D’Ellena at the Santa Reparata International School of Art in Florence, Italy. Further documentation coming soon. View specimen (→)


How can you represent a physical space in a book? This printed collection of herbarium vouchers from The Missouri Botanical Garden displays the garden’s long history of restoration efforts and highlights the wide variety of herbaria on display at the gardens. Completed under the guidance of Chrissi Cowhey at Washington University in St. Louis.

Brand identity and poster design for Google’s collaboration with San Francisco Design Week whose 2022 theme was Edge Effect. Completed in collaboration with Megan Lynch, Amber Pietrzyk, and Kate Cullinane.
Art direction guidance and web design for Figma’s new blog, Shortcut. Completed in collaboration with Arietta Tetreault, Patsy Shin, James Casey, Flora Kim, and many others at Instrument.
Using shapes derived from existing typography, such as serifs, terminals, bowls, I challenged both myself and my peers to create letterforms from a curated collection of shapes. Completed under the guidance of Alessio D’Ellena at the Santa Reparata International School of Art in Florence, Italy.
Various art direction work for Google Design to be used both online and in print. Featured illustrators: Jatinder Singh Durhailay, Anna Mills, Hannah Buckman, and Max Guther. Completed with the help of Anyways Creative.
Creating vector duotones using Python and Drawbot. The code translates the image pixels into flat geometric shapes and the parameters of the function can be varied to customize the duotone effect, such as the size of the pixels, the density of the pixels and more. View the code here and feel free to try it out yourself. Created with the help of Ben Kiel at Washington University in St. Louis.

An interactive guide to the Abstract Expressionist art movement of the 1950s in New York City that rocked the international art scene. Completed under the guidance of Jonathan Hanahan in Spring 2020 at Washington University in St. Louis. Visit the live site (→)


Fictional posters for events and exhibitions at the Museo del Novecento in Florence, Italy. Museo del Novecento is Florence’s only contemporary art museum. Completed under the guidance of Silvia Aggozzino at the Santa Reparata International School of Art in Florence, Italy in Spring 2019.

Oswald Display is an interactive CSS typeface animated using Javascript, JQuery and Anime.js. Visit the live site to hover, click and scroll to see the letters transform. Completed under the guidance of Jonathan Hanahan at Washington University in St. Louis. Visit the live site (→)


A visual repository of references I collected over the course of one semester—including articles, designers, interesting projects, studios, books I’d read, and various areas of interest I wanted to bookmark. By taking time to find references each week, I encouraged myself to maintain a consistent practice of research and exploration during my studies. Visit the live site (→)

Experimenting with modes of interaction on the web, including hovering, clicking and holding down the mouse. Coded using Javascript and Anime.js. Completed under the guidance of Jonathan Hanahan in Fall 2019 at Washington University in St. Louis. Visit the live site (→)


Armour Magazine is Washington University’s student-run style and culture magazine. Natalia Oledkza and I served as Design Directors of the magazine for the last two years. This issue, No. 23, sought to move away from style and highlight members of the community. Pictured are some spreads Issue No. 23, which was designed in Fall 2019.

Various coding experiments completed in the past year that explore different modes of interaction on a web browser, such as scrolling and resizing the browser window. Visit the sites here: scroll, resize.

An events calendar for the Fall 2018 events at the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts. As a double sided poster, the calendar serves as both a source of information and an eye-catching advertisement for the school’s events. The printed poster measures 35 x 50 inches.